Quotes for Events - Ramadan

Share Your Quotes Join Us Inspire & Move Your Friends

How do you feel today?    I feel ...

Quotes for Ramadan, which is is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar and the month of fasting for Muslims.

The month of Ramadan in which was revealed the Qur'an, a guidance for mankind, and clear proofs of the guidance, and the Criterion (of right and wrong). And whosoever of you is present, let him fast the month, and whosoever of you is sick or on a journey, (let him fast the same) number of other days. Allah desireth for you ease; He desireth not hardship for you; and (He desireth) that ye should complete the period, and that ye should magnify Allah for having guided you, and that peradverture ye may be thankful.

Eat and drink until the white thread becometh distinct to you from the black thread of the dawn.
Thirty days make up the month, and yet, as God's Qur'an doth tell, In degree the Night of Merit doth a thousand months excel.
It is affirmed [in the 97th chapter of the Qur'an] to be "better than a thousand months"; and the angels are believed to descend, and to be occupied in conveying blessings to the faithful from the commencement of it until daybreak. Moreover, the gates of heaven being then opened, prayer is held to be certain of success. Salt water, it is said, suddenly becomes sweet on this night.
As Queequeg's Ramadan or Fasting and Humiliation, was to continue all day, I did not choose to disturb him till towards night-fall: for I cherish the greatest respect towards everybody's religious obligations, never mind how comical, and could not find it in my heart to undervalue even a congregation of ants worshipping a toad-stool.
Like the Italian, the Anglo-Catholic, and the Greek fasts, the chief effect of the "blessed month" upon True Believers is to darken their tempers into positive gloom. . . . The mosques are crowded with a sulky, grumbling population, making themselves offensive to one another on earth whilst working their way to heaven.
Ramathan, the fasting month, was nearly in, which kindles in Moslem spirits, even of the wild Arab, a new solemnity of religion; the Beduins, aping the town guise, which they had seen at Medina, now stood out from the byut at the hours, and making ranks, they rehearsed the formal prayer, bowing the empty foreheads and falling upon the petticoated knees together.
When the new moon has been seen, the news passes like wild fire through the town, and soon it seems as though all the noise suppressed for a whole month has concentrated itself within one night.
A person walking in the lanes of Mecca on a Ramadan morning hears voices chanting the Koran in nearly every house. Many do their chanting in the cloisters of the Haram. Thus, with sleeping, reading and praying, the Muslims spend the long slow hours until sunset.
There is clearly an ascetic aspect in the multiple dimensions of the practice of the Ramadan fast; to savour the poverty of the poor, their hunger, to fast, to share with them, to expiate one's own sins, to forgive others theirs, to renew contact with one's nearest and dearest, to tame one's passions, to counter Satan at every turn.