Quotes for Events - Menopause

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Quotes for menopause.

Pregnancy and childbirth are pretty rotten jokes to play on the female, but I cannot help suspecting that the menopause may be nature's last--and most outrageous--grand belly laugh.

Menopause is a time when, if we have not already done so, we should learn to take as good care of ourselves as we do of others. Many women become more self-confident and assertive and less interested in pleasing others. Increasingly, women are writing about the change of life, or menopause, as a time of preparing for later life through emotional and spiritual transformation. . . . . . . Women at midlife may be subject to overtreatment when physicians view the normal changes of menopause as a deficiency disease requiring medication, or they may suffer from undertreatment and misdiagnosis of real symptoms of disease. Some physicians attribute to menopause almost anything reported by women at midlife, overlooking what might be symptoms of gallbladder disease, hypertension, and other serious conditions.
To be precise, the word "menopause" applies to a non-event, the menstrual period that does not happen. It is the invisible Rubicon that a woman cannot know she is crossing until she has crossed it.
The central myth is that menopause is a time in a woman's life when she goes batty for a few years--subject to wild rages and deep depressions--and after it she mourns her lost youth and fades into the wood-work. In truth, menopause is a bridge to the most vital and liberated period in a woman's life.
The best gift for making a conscious, disciplined trip through menopause is postmenopausal zest. This is a special, buoyant sort of energy, fueled in part by the change in ratio of testosterone to estrogen. . . . Once a woman has come through the menopausal passage, she can say good-bye to pregnancy fears and monthly mood swings. Now that she is no longer confined by society's narrow definition of woman as sex object and breeder, she is freer to integrate the masculine and feminine aspects of her nature. She can now claim the license to say what she truly thinks.
In the South of my childhood, no woman could weather the "Change" completely unscathed; it was femininity's Appomattox and you had to milk it for every possible drop of theater.
Menopause would be celebrated as a positive event, the symbol that men had accumulated enough years of cyclical wisdom to need no more.
I would like it if men had to partake in the same hormonal cycles to which we're subjected monthly. Maybe that's why men declare war - because they have a need to bleed on a regular basis.
Though there is no public rite of passage for the woman approaching the end of her reproductive years, there is evidence that women devise their own private ways of marking the irrevocability of the change. . . . The climacteric is a time of stock-taking, of spiritual as well as physical change, and it would be a pity to be unconscious of it.
Menopause--word used as an insult: a menopausal woman, mind or poem as if not to leak regularly or on the caprice of the moon, the collision of egg and sperm, were the curse we first learned to call that blood.
Menopause Manor is not merely a defensive stronghold. . . . It is a house or household, fully furnished with the necessities of life. In abandoning it, women have narrowed their domain and impoverished their souls. There are things the Old Woman can do, say, and think that the Woman cannot do, say, or think. The Woman has to give up more than her menstrual periods before she can do, say, or think them. She has got to change her life.
The crisis of the menopause rudely cuts the life of woman in two; the resulting discontinuity is what gives woman the illusion of a "new life"; it is another time that opens before her, so she enters upon it with the fervor of a convert; she is converted to love, to the godly life, to art, to humanity; in these entities she loses herself and magnifies herself.
In this country it is more despicable to be married and not fruitful, than it is with us to be fruitful before marriage. They have a notion, that, whenever a woman leaves off bringing children, it is because she is too old for that business, whatever her face says to the contrary, and this opinion makes the ladies here so ready to make proofs of their youth . . . that they do not content themselves with using the natural means, but fly to all sorts of quackeries, to avoid the scandal of being past child-bearing, and often kill themselves by them.