Quotes for Events - Independence Day

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Quotes for Independence Day.

Seasons pursuing each other the indescribable crowd is gathered, it is the fourth of Seventh-month, (what salutes of cannon and small-arms!)

The new Governments we are assuming in every Part will require a Purification from our Vices, and an Augmentation of our Virtues, or they will have no Blessings. The people will have unbounded Power. And the people are extremely addicted to Corruption and Venality, as well as the Great.
The Fourth of July has been celebrated in Philadelphia in the manner I expected. The military men, and particularly one of them, ran away with all the glory of the day. Scarcely a word was said of the solicitude and labors and fears and sorrows and sleepless nights of the men who projected, proposed, defended and subscribed the Declaration of Independence.
Dating, as we justly may, a new era in the history of man from the Fourth of July, 1776, it would be well--that is it would be useful--if on each anniversary we examined the progress made by our species in just knowledge and just practice. Each Fourth of July would then stand as a tidemark in the flood of time by which to ascertain the advance of the human intellect, by which to note the rise and fall of each successive error, the discovery of each important truth, the gradual melioration in our public institutions, social arrangements, and, above all, in our moral feelings and mental views.
Yet America is a poem in our eyes; its ample geography dazzles the imagination, and it will not wait long for metres.
We grant no dukedoms to the few, We hold like rights and shall;--Equal on Sunday in the pew, On Monday in the mall. For what avail the plough or sail, Or land or life, if freedom fail? The noble craftsman we promote, Disown the knave and fool Each honest man shall have his vote, Each child shall have his school. A union then of honest men, Or union nevermore again.
We give thy natal day to hope, O Country of our love and prayer! Thy way is down no fatal slope, But up to freer sun and air. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A refuge for the wronged and poor, Thy generous heart has borne the blame That, with them, through thy open door, The old world's evil outcasts came.
I know that upon 4th of July, our 4th of July orators talk of Liberty, while three million of their own country men are groaning in abject Slavery. This is called "the land of the free and the home of the brave"; it is called the "asylum of the oppressed"; and some have been foolish enough to call it the "Cradle of Liberty." If it is the "cradle of liberty," they have rocked the child to death. It is dead long since, and yet we talk about democracy and republicanism, while one-sixth of our countrymen are clanking their chains upon the very soil which our fathers moistened with their blood.
The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity and independence, bequeathed by your fathers, is shared by you, not by me. The sunlight that brought light and healing to you, has brought stripes and death to me. This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn.
The President, throned behind a cable locker with a national flag spread over it, announced the "Reader," who rose up and read that same old Declaration of Independence which we have all listened to so often without paying any attention to what it said; and after that the President piped the Orator of the Day to quarters and he made the same old speech about our national greatness which we so religiously believe and so fervently applaud. Now came the choir into court again, with the complaining instruments, and assaulted "Hail Columbia"; and when victory hung wavering in the scale, George returned with his dreadful wild-goose stop turned on and the choir won, of course. A minister pronounced the benediction, and the patriotic little gathering disbanded. The Fourth of July was safe, as far as the Mediterranean was concerned.
July 4. Statistics show that we lose more fools on this day than in all the other days of the year put together. This proves, by the number left in stock, that one Fourth of July per year is now inadequate, the country has grown so.
We [Americans] are the lavishest and showiest and most luxury-loving people on the earth; and at our masthead we fly one true and honest symbol, the gaudiest flag the world has ever seen.
The business of the Fourth of July is not perfect as it stands. See what it costs us every year with loss of life, the crippling of thousands with its fireworks and the burning down of property. It is not only sacred to patriotism and universal freedom but to the surgeon, the undertaker, the insurance offices--and they are working it for all it is worth.
Sing in the tones of prayer, Sing till the soaring soul Shall float above the world's control In Freedom everywhere! Sing for the good that is to be, Sing for the eyes that are to see The land where man at last is free, O sing for Liberty!
There'll be ice-cream and fireworks and a speech By Somebody the Honorable Who, The lovers will pair off in the kind dark And Tessie Jones, our honor-graduate, Will read the Declaration. That's how it is. It's always been that way. That's our Fourth of July, through war and peace, That's our Fourth of July.
That rugged individualism that is the personification of our American sense of freedom, and which we celebrate on the Fourth of July and in our popular myths and heroes, also contributes to the breakdown of the social fabric that has always provided a secure context for our freedoms. Freedom "from" has not yet yielded to an appropriate freedom "for."
Master, I've filled my contract, wrought in Thy many lands; Not by my sins wilt Thou judge me, but by the work of my hands. Master, I've done Thy bidding, and the light is low in the west, And the long, long shift is over . . . Master, I've earned it--Rest.