Quotes for Events - Health, Hospitals and Doctors

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Quotes for health, hospitals and doctors. There's always someone important in your life, it seems, who;s either under the weather, facing surgery, getting a face life, or coping with a serious disease. Keep those cards and letters coming--the boost morale, and the immune system, doing your special someone immeasurable good.

The doctor should be opaque to his patients and, like a mirror, should show them nothing but what is shown to him.

Is not disease the rule of existence? There is not a lily pad floating on the river but has been riddled by insects. Almost every shrub and tree has its gall, oftentimes esteemed its chief ornament and hardly to be distinguished from the fruit. If misery loves company, misery has company enough. Now, at midsummer, find me a perfect leaf or fruit.
Children show scars like medals. Lovers use them as secrets to reveal. A scar is what happens when the word is made flesh.
Surgeons must be very careful. When they take the knife!, underneath their fine incisions, stirs the Culprit -- Life!
Schizophrenia may be a necessary consequence of literacy.
PHYSICIAN, n. One upon whom we set our hopes when ill and our dogs when well.
We are so fond of one another because our ailments are the same.
Every man is the builder of a temple, called his body, to the god he worships, after a style purely his own, nor can he get off by hammering marble instead. We are all sculptors and painters, and our material is our own flesh and blood and bones. Any nobleness begins at once to refine a man’s features, any meanness or sensuality to imbrute them.
What was my body to me? A kind of flunkey in my service. Let but my anger wax hot, my love grow exalted, my hatred collect in me, and that boasted solidarity between me and my body was gone.
The basic Female body comes with the following accessories: garter belt, panty-girdle, crinoline, camisole, bustle, brassiere, stomacher, chemise, virgin zone, spike heels, nose ring, veil, kid gloves, fishnet stockings, fichu, bandeau, Merry Widow, weepers, chokers, barrettes, bangles, beads, lorgnette, feather boa, basic black, compact, Lycra stretch one-piece with modesty panel, designer peignoir, flannel nightie, lace teddy, bed, head.
After two days in hospital, I took a turn for the nurse.
Man seems to be a rickety poor sort of a thing, any way you take him; a kind of British Museum of infirmities and inferiorities. He is always undergoing repairs. A machine that was as unreliable as he is would have no market.
No man, not even a doctor, ever gives any other definition of what a nurse should be than this—“devoted and obedient.” This definition would do just as well for a porter. It might even do for a horse. It would not do for a policeman.
He who advises a sick man, whose manner of life is prejudicial to health, is clearly bound first of all to change his patient’s manner of life.
Sunday—the doctor’s paradise! Doctors at country clubs, doctors at the seaside, doctors with mistresses, doctors with wives, doctors in church, doctors in yachts, doctors everywhere resolutely being people, not doctors.
I am always running into peoples’ unconscious.
We serve the patient in various functions, as an authority and a substitute for his parents, as a teacher and educator.
Psychotherapy has taught us that in the final reckoning it is not knowledge, not technical skill, that has a curative effect, but the personality of the doctor.
The last four years of psychoanalysis are a waste of money.
Before I went into analysis, I told everyone lies—but when you spend all that money, you tell the truth….
You can be down, you can even be broken, but there’s always a way to mend.
He had been in analysis for seven years and he regarded life as a long disease, alleviated by little fifty-minute bloodlettings of words from the couch.
Psychotherapy can be one of the greatest and most rewarding adventures, it can bring with it the deepest feelings of personal worth, of purpose and richness in living.
My therapist told me the way to achieve true inner peace is to finish what I start. So far today, I have finished two bags of M&M’s and a chocolate cake. I feel better already.
Incidentally, why was it that none of all the pious ever discovered psycho-analysis? Why did it have to wait for a completely godless Jew?
A junky runs on junk time. When his junk is cut off, the clock runs down and stops. All he can do is hang on and wait for non-junk time to start.
Every affliction has its own rich lesson to teach, if we would learn it.
The least you can do is recuperate!
Don’t worry about your heart, it will last you as long as you live.
Be bold and LOVE YOUR BODY. STOP FIXING IT. It was never broken.
The moon lives in the lining of your skin.
I don’t know what my mother-in-law’s measurements are. We haven’t had her surveyed yet.
It used to be said that by a certain age a man had the face that he deserved. Nowadays, he has the face he can afford.
I pick up the magazines. I buy into the ideal. I believe that blond, flat girls have the secret. What is far more frightening than narcissism is the zeal for self-mutilation that is spreading, infecting the world.
As in a theater and circus the statues of the king must be kept clean by him to whom they have been entrusted, so the bathing of the body is a duty of man, who was created in the image of the almighty King of the world.
Personal size and mental sorrow have certainly no necessary proportions. A large bulky figure has as good a right to be in deep affliction as the most graceful set of limbs in the world. But, fair or not fair, there are unbecoming conjunctions, which… taste cannot tolerate—which ridicule will seize.
The first time I see a jogger smiling, I’ll consider it.
The mind and the heart sometimes get another chance, but if anything happens to the poor old human frame, why, it’s just out of luck, that’s all.
Back in my rummy days, I would tremble and shake for hours upon arising. It was the only exercise I got.
Illness sets the mind free sometimes to roam and surmise.
I think of my illness as a school, and finally I’ve graduated.
If God made the body and the body is dirty, the fault lies with the manufacturer.
Numbing the pain for a while will make it worse when you finally feel it.
Men’s bodies are the most dangerous things on earth.
Human beings are divided into mind and body. The mind embraces all the nobler aspirations, like poetry and philosophy, but the body has all the fun.
My HMO is so expensive, they charge me for a self-breast exam. It’s a flat fee.
Next to gold and jewelry, health is the most important thing you can have.
My sore throats are always worse than everyone’s.
“Medicine seems to be all cycles,” continued Mrs. Hartshorn. “That’s the bone I pick with Sloan. Like what’s his name’s new theory of history. First we nursed our babies; then science told us not to. Now it tells us we were right in the first place. Or were we wrong then but would be right now? Reminds me of relativity, if I understand Mr. Einstein.”
Besides the obstinancy of the nurse, I had the ignorance of the physicians to contend with.
Psychotherapy, unlike castor oil, which will work no matter how you get it down, is useless when forced on an uncooperative patient.
Why, if it wasn’t for psychoanalysis you’d never find out how wonderful your own mind is!
In those days, all I did, when I wasn’t taking pills (speed, Ritalin especially) all day, was drink all night.
A doctor’s reputation is made by the number of eminent men who die under his care.
I think it’s time for a real woman who has led a real life to re-design Barbie …. Her hips could start out at a normal size and then quietly expand over the years while she remained powerless to do anything about it …. Are you listening, Mattel?
We currently have a system for taking care of sickness. We do not have a system for enhancing and promoting health.
“And how are you?” said Winnie-the-Pooh …. // “Not very how,” he said. “I don’t seem to have felt at all how for a long time.”
My health is so often impaired that I begin to be as weary of it as mending old lace; when it is patched in one place, it breaks out in another.
I do not deny that medicine is a gift of God, nor do I refuse to acknowledge science in the skill of many physicians; but, take the best of them, how far are they from perfection? . . . I have no objection to the doctors acting upon certain theories, but, at the same time, they must not expect us to be the slaves of their fancies.
Physicians are some of them so pleasing and conformable to the humour of the patient, as they press not the true cure of the disease; and some are so regular in proceeding according to art for the disease, as they respect not sufficiently the condition of the patient. Take one of a middle temper; or if it may not be found in one man, combine two of either sort; and forget not to call, as well the best acquainted with your body, as the best reputed of for his faculty.
When the artlesse Doctor sees No one hope, but of his Fees, And his skill runs on the lees, Sweet Spirit comfort me!
God heales, and the Physitian hath the thankes.
When a doctor talks to you of aiding, succouring and relieving nature, of taking away from her what is injurious and of giving her what she lacks; of re-establishing her and restoring her to the full exercise of her functions; when he talks to you of purifying the blood, of regulating the bowels and the brain, of reducing the spleen, of strengthening the chest, of renovating the liver, of improving the action of the heart, of re-establishing and preserving natural heat, and being possessed of secrets which will prolong life for many years: he is beguiling you with the romance of physic. But, when you come to learn the truth of things by experience, you find there is nothing in it all, it is like those beautiful dreams which, when you wake, leave you nothing but the regret of having put faith in them.
God heals, and the doctor takes the fees.
If you are making choice of a physician, be sure you get one, if possible, with a cheerful and serene countenance.
For everybody's family doctor was remarkably clever, and was understood to have immeasurable skill in the management and training of the most skittish or vicious diseases. The evidence of his cleverness was of the higher intuitive order, lying in his lady-patients' immovable conviction, and was unassailable by any objection except that their intuitions were opposed by others equally strong; each lady who saw medical truth in Wrench and "the strengthening treatment" regarding Toller and "the lowering system" as medical perdition. . . . The strengtheners and the lowerers were all "clever" men in somebody's opinion, which is really as much as can be said for any living talents.
It is the humdrum, day-in, day-out, everyday work that is the real satisfaction of the practice of medicine; the million and a half patients a man has seen on his daily visits over a forty-year period of weekdays and Sundays that make up his life. I have never had a money practice; it would have been impossible for me. But the actual calling on people, at all times and under all conditions, the coming to grips with the intimate conditions of their lives, when they were being born, when they were dying, watching them die, watching them get well when they were ill, has always absorbed me.
Have your own doctor, who answers to you. If you don't, when the time comes that you get mixed up with hospitals, they'll treat you like a fool. . . . You're bound to lose your health at some point, but you don't have to lose your dignity, too.
Here in the hospital, I say, that is not my body, not my body. I am not here for the doctors to read like a recipe.
Doctors need to give every patient a chance to talk with their clothes on after the examination is over.
There is, of course, an ordinary medicine, an everyday medicine, humdrum, prosaic, a medicine for stubbed toes, quinsies, bunions and boils; but all of us entertain the idea of another sort of medicine, of a wholly different kind: something deeper, older, extraordinary, almost sacred, which will restore to us our lost health and wholeness, and give us a sense of perfect well-being.
The first thing about being a patient is--you have to be patient.
I like to see doctors cough. What kind of human being would grab all your money just when you're down? I'm not saying they enjoy this: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . they'd rather be playing golf and swapping jokes about our feet.