Quotes for Events - First Home

Share Your Quotes Join Us Inspire & Move Your Friends

How do you feel today?    I feel ...

Quotes for first home. First apartment? First time homeowner? Newly moved into the neighbourhood? Whether the new place is a tiny studio apartment or a stately mansion, moving and making a new home can be distressing, exciting, and scary. Whatever the emotion, help is on the way. If you can't be there to lend a hand, mark the occasion with one of these quotes.

The ornament of a house is the friends who frequent it.

Through wisdom is an house builded; and by understanding it is established; and by knowledge shall every room be filled with precious and pleasant riches.
Home is any four walls that enclose the right person.
I had three chairs in my house; one for solitude, two for friendship, three for society.
The nearer society approaches to divine order, the less separation will there be in the characters, duties, and pursuits of men and women. Women will not become less gentle and graceful, but men will become more so. Women will not neglect the care and education of their children, but men will find themselves ennobled and refined by sharing those duties with them; and will receive, in return, co-operation and sympathy in the discharge of various other duties, now deemed inappropriate to women. The more women become rational companions, partners in business and in thought, as well as in affection and amusement, the more highly will men appreciate home.
Cleaning your house while your kids are still growing is like shoveling the walk before it stops snowing.
I hate housework! You make the beds, you do the dishes -- and six months later you have to start all over again.
The labor of keeping house is labor in its most naked state, for labor is toil that never finishes, toil that has to be begun again the moment it is completed, toil that is destroyed and consumed by the life process.
Houses are built to live in, and not to look on; therefore let use be preferred before uniformity, except where both may be had. Leave the goodly fabrics of houses, for beauty only, to the enchanted palaces of the poets; who build them with small cost.
The problem lay buried, unspoken for many years in the minds of American women. It was a strange stirring, a sense of dissatisfaction, a yearning that women suffered in the middle of the twentieth century in the United States. Each suburban housewife struggled with it alone. As she made the beds, shopped for groceries, matched slipcover material, ate peanut butter sandwiches with her children, chauffeured Cub Scouts and Brownies, lay beside her husband at night, she was afraid to ask even of herself the silent question: Is this all?
Those comfortably padded lunatic asylums which are known, euphemistically, as the stately homes of England.
… one of the best gifts of the gods … a good, faithful housekeeper … But for this noble, self-sacrificing woman, much of my public work would have been quite impossible.
Perhaps all artists were, in a sense, housewives: tenders of the earth household.
Should not every apartment in which man dwells be lofty enough to create some obscurity overhead, where flickering shadows may play at evening about the rafters?
A house in which there are no people—but with all the signs of tenancy—can be a most tranquil good place.
Work a lifetime to pay off a house—You finally own it and there’s nobody to live in it.
I can tell by your eye shadow, you’re from Brooklyn, right? … Me too. My mother has plastic covers on all the furniture. Even the poodle. Looked like a barking hassock walking down the street.
It is the time you have wasted for your rose that makes your rose so important.
The home was a closed sphere touched only at its edge by the world’s evolution.
There was no loneliness in the living room. So it was a good part, and maybe the best part of the house.
While civilization has been improving our houses, it has not equally improved the men who are to inhabit them.
Men such as him do not have to clean up the messes they make, but we have to clean up our own messes, and theirs into the bargain. In that way, they are like children, they do not have to think ahead, or worry about the consequences of what they do.
It is a proud moment in a woman’s life to reign supreme within four walls, to be the one to whom all questions of domestic pleasure and economy are referred.
Housekeeping ain’t no joke.
It is certainly true that housekeeping cares bring with them a thousand endearing compensations. They are a woman’s peculiar joy, and women are apt to be light-hearted.
Viciousness in the kitchen! The potatoes hiss.
Re: the family maid: She used to come over and make tuna salad and we’d watch Let’s Make a Deal while my mom cleaned the house.
“Housewives” is a term I employ that means anybody who has ever had to clean up somebody else’s shit and not been paid for it ….
… the whole process of home-making, housekeeping and cooking, which ever has been woman’s special province, should be looked on as an art and a profession.
Maybe it will take a woman to clean up the House.
Home wasn’t built in a day.
Willy: To weather a twenty-five-year mortgage is--Linda: It's an accomplishment.
An old house is a nuisance, but it is obviously intended for men and women to live in. Much modern housing would be better called kenneling.
Man is but mildly interested in his immediate surroundings because he can find self-expression in projects. Whereas woman is confined within the conjugal sphere; it is for her to change that prison into a realm.
The home should offer to the individual rest, peace, quiet, comfort, health, and that degree of personal expression requisite; and these conditions should be maintained by the best methods of the time. The home should be to the child a place of happiness and true development; to the adult a place of happiness and that beautiful reinforcement of the spirit needed by the world's workers.
Is the house not homely yet? There let pleasant thoughts be set: With bright eyes and hurried feet, There let severed friendships meet, There let sorrow learn to smile, And sweet talk the nights beguile.
Let us celebrate the soil. Most men toil that they may own a piece of it; they measure their success in life by their ability to buy it. It is alike the passion of the parvenu and the pride of the aristocrat. Broad acres are a patent of nobility; and no man but feels more of a man in the world if he have a bit of ground that he can call his own. However small it is on the surface, it is four thousand miles deep; and that is a very handsome property.
Let a little preliminary exultation of a new man in a new place be forgiven, ye who are now established! Remember your own household fervor on first setting up, while we recount our economic joy, and anticipations of modern conveniences that would take away all human care, and speed life upon a downhill path, where it was to be easier to move than to stand still!
I was married when I was twenty-five years old to a man rich in Greek and Hebrew, Latin and Arabic, and, alas! rich in nothing else. When I went to housekeeping, my entire stock of china for parlor and kitchen was bought for eleven dollars. That lasted very well for two years, till my brother was married and brought his bride to visit me. I then found, on review, that I had neither plates nor teacups to set a table for my father's family; wherefore I thought it best to reinforce the establishment by getting me a tea-set that cost ten dollars more, and this, I believe, formed my whole stock in trade for some years.
A house, like a person, invites by amiable reserves, as if it loved to be introduced in perspective and reached by courteous approaches. Let it show bashfully behind shrubberies, screen its proportions decorously in plain tints, not thrust itself rudely, like an inn, upon the street at cross-roads. A wide lawn in front, sloping to the road gracefully, gives it the stately air and courtly approach.
Ah! happy is the man whose early lot Hath made him master of a furnished cot.
Lord, Thou hast given me a cell Wherein to dwell; And little house, whose humble Roof Is weather-proof.
Eat less than you can afford, dress less fittingly, but have a fine dwelling.
No matter how dreary and gray our homes are, we people of flesh and blood would rather live there than in any other country, be it ever so beautiful. There is no place like home.
The Indian … stands free and unconstrained in Nature, is her inhabitant and not her guest, and wears her easily and gracefully. But the civilized man has the habits of the house. His house is a prison.
What is the use of a house if you haven’t got a tolerable planet to put it on?
I’ll dig in / into my days, having come here to live, not to visit. / Grey is the price / of neighboring with eagles, of knowing / a mountain’s vast presence, seen or unseen.
We said there warn’t no home like a raft, after all. Other places do seem so cramped up and smothery, but a raft don’t. You feel mighty free and easy and comfortable on a raft.
A man builds a fine house; and now he has a master, and a task for life: he is to furnish, watch, show it, and keep it in repair, the rest of his days.
A man in the house is worth two in the street.
“Woman’s work! Housework’s the hardest work in the world. That’s why men won’t do it.”
I’m nine years behind in my ironing. I bury a lot in the backyard.
But I think women dwell quite a bit on the duress under which they work, on how hard it is just to do it at all. We are traditionally rather proud of ourselves for having slipped creative work in there between the domestic chores and obligations. I’m not sure we deserve such big A-pluses for all that.
I have too many fantasies to be a housewife … I guess I am a fantasy.
… there is something dangerous about being a housewife.
I’m a wonderful housekeeper. Every time I get a divorce I keep the house.
I’m not going to vacuum ’til Sears makes one you can ride on.
Nothing succeeds like address.
HOUSE, n. A hollow edifice erected for the habitation of man, rat, mouse, beetle, cockroach, fly, mosquito, flea, bacillus, and microbe.
People are not expected to be large in proportion to the houses they live in, like snails.
We need not power or splendor; Wide hall or lordly dome; The good, the true, the tender, These form the wealth of home.