Gemma - my quote collection

Gems's recent activities

I haven't bookmarked any quotes at the moment.

Gems's bookmarks

If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.

But words are things, and a small drop of ink, falling like dew, upon a thought, produces that which makes thousands, perhaps millions, think.
I have found the paradox that if I love until it hurts, then there is no hurt, but only more love.
Age is a question of mind over matter. If you don't mind, age don't matter.
Happiness is not a horse, you cannot harness it.
The pain we feel When someone leaves our life is in direct proportion to the joy they bring while a part of our life for a few moments. In my life you made me feel as if I truly meant something to someone
A book is a part of life, a manifestation of life, just as much as a tree or a horse or a star. It obeys its own rhythms, its own laws, whether it be a novel, a play, or a diary. The deep, hidden rhythm of life is always there -- that of the pulse, the heart beat.
This is not a book. This is libel, slander, defamation of character. This is not a book, in the ordinary sense of the word. No, this is a prolonged insult, a gob of spit in the face of Art, a kick in the pants to God, Man, Destiny, Time, Love, Beauty... what you will. I am going to sing for you, a little off key perhaps, but I will sing.
The pleasure of reading is doubled when one lives with another who shares the same books.
A house without books is like a room without windows. No man has a right to bring up his children without surrounding them with books, if he has the means to buy them. It is a wrong to his family. Children learn to read by being in the presence of books. The love of knowledge comes with reading and grows upon it. And the love of knowledge, in a young mind, is almost always a warrant against the inferior excitement of passions and vices.
Everything in the world exists to end up in a book.
Who kills a man kills a reasonable creature, God's image, but thee who destroys a good book, kills reason itself.
No entertainment is so cheap as reading, nor is any pleasure so lasting.
The books one reads in childhood, and perhaps most of all the bad and good bad books, create in one's mind a sort of false map of the world, a series of fabulous countries into which one can retreat at odd moments throughout the rest of life, and which in some cases can survive a visit to the real countries which they are supposed to represent.
I cannot live without books.
This book is not to be tossed lightly aside, but to be hurled with great force.
No man understands a deep book until he has seen and lived at least part of its contents.
Reading makes immigrants of us all. It takes us away from home, but more important, it finds homes for us everywhere.
In science, read by preference the newest works. In literature, read the oldest. The classics are always modern.
Books are the bees which carry the quickening pollen from one to another mind.
For books are more than books, they are the life, the very heart and core of ages past, the reason why men lived and worked and died, the essence and quintessence of their lives.
Tradition is but a meteor, which, if it once falls, cannot be rekindled. Memory, once interrupted, is not to be recalled. But written learning is a fixed luminary, which, after the cloud that had hidden it has passed away, is again bright in its proper station. So books are faithful repositories, which may be awhile neglected or forgotten, but when opened again, will again impart instruction.
You will be the same person in five years as you are today except for the people you meet and the books you read.
Everywhere I have sought rest and not found it, except sitting in a corner by myself with a little book.
I love to lose myself in other men's minds. When I am not walking, I am reading. I cannot sit and think; books think for me.
What is reading, but silent conversation.
Until I feared I would lose it, I never loved to read. One does not love breathing.
For a good book has this quality, that it is not merely a petrifaction of its author, but that once it has been tossed behind, like Deucalion's little stone, it acquires a separate and vivid life of its own.
There are very many people who read simply to prevent themselves from thinking.
A vacuum of ideas affects people differently than a vacuum of air, otherwise readers of books would be constantly collapsing.
A book is a mirror: If an ass peers into it, you can't expect an apostle to look out.
The things I want to know are in books; my best friend is the man who'll get me a book I ain't read.
Reading furnishes the mind only with material for knowledge; it is thinking that makes what we read ours.
Everything you need for better future and success has already been written. And guess what? All you have to do is go to the library.
The reason that fiction is more interesting than any other form of literature, to those who really like to study people, is that in fiction the author can really tell the truth without humiliating himself.
A classic is something that everybody wants to have read and nobody wants to read.
My books are water; those of the great geniuses are wine -- everybody drinks water.
The man who does not read books has no advantage over the man that can not read them.
I wish I could write a beautiful book to break those hearts that are soon to cease to exist: a book of faith and small neat worlds and of people who live by the philosophies of popular songs.
Ideally a book would have no order to it, and the reader would have to discover his own.
Beware you be not swallowed up in books! An ounce of love is worth a pound of knowledge.
The books that the world calls immoral are the books that show the world its own shame.
Choose an author as you choose a friend.
The most valuable thing in my wallet is my library card.
A book burrows into your life in a very profound way because the experience of reading is not passive.
I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.
I didn't ask for it to be over. But then again I didn't ask for it to begin. For that's the way it is with life, as some of the most beautiful days come completely by chance. But even the most beautiful days eventually have their sunset
Book love... is your pass to the greatest, the purest, and the most perfect pleasure that God has prepared for His creatures.
No matter how busy you may think you are, you must find time for reading, or surrender yourself to self-chosen ignorance.
I am what libraries and librarians have made me, with little assistance from a professor of Greek and poets.
Without books the development of civilization would have been impossible. They are the engines of change, windows on the world, Lighthouses as the poet said erected in the sea of time. They are companions, teachers, magicians, bankers of the treasures of the mind, Books are humanity in print.
Don't ask me who's influenced me. A lion is made up of the lambs he's digested, and I've been reading all my life.
People say that life is the thing, but I prefer reading.
Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body. It is wholesome and bracing for the mind to have its faculties kept on the stretch.
A book is like a man -- clever and dull, brave and cowardly, beautiful and ugly. For every flowering thought there will be a page like a wet and mangy mongrel, and for every looping flight a tap on the wing and a reminder that wax cannot hold the feathers firm too near the sun.
Digressions, incontestably, are the sunshine; they are the life, the soul of reading! Take them out of this book, for instance, --you might as well take the book along with them; --one cold external winter would reign in every page of it; restore them to the writer; --he steps forth like a bridegroom, --bids All-hail; brings in variety, and forbids the appetite to fail.
A great book should leave you with many experiences and slightly exhausted at the end. You should live several lives while reading it.
Most books, like their authors, are born to die; of only a few books can it be said that death has no dominion over them; they live, and their influence lives forever.
Books, like proverbs, receive their chief value from the stamp and esteem of the ages through which they have passed
What is a diary as a rule? A document useful to the person who keeps it. Dull to the contemporary who reads it and invaluable to the student, centuries afterwards, who treasures it.
I always begin at the left with the opening word of the sentence and read toward the right and I recommend this method.
What is the most precious, the most exciting smell awaiting you in the house when you return to it after a dozen years or so? The smell of roses, you think? No, moldering books.
It is books that teach us to refine our pleasures when young, and to recall them with satisfaction when we are old.
We should be as careful of the books we read, as of the company we keep. The dead very often have more power than the living.
There is more treasure in books than in all the pirates loot on Treasure Island and best of all, you can enjoy these riches every day of your life.
The reading of all good books is like a conversation with all the finest men of past centuries.
Many books require no thought from those who read them, and for a very simple reason: they made no such demand upon those who wrote them. Those works, therefore, are the most valuable, that set our thinking faculties in the fullest operation. understand them.
A good book, in the language of the book-sellers, is a salable one; in that of the curious, a scarce one; in that of men of sense, a useful and instructive one.
Does there, I wonder, exist a being who has read all, or approximately all, that the person of average culture is supposed to have read, and that not to have read is a social sin? If such a being does exist, surely he is an old, a very old man.
The power of a text is different when it is read from when it is copied out. Only the copied text thus commands the soul of him who is occupied with it, whereas the mere reader never discovers the new aspects of his inner self that are opened by the text, that road cut through the interior jungle forever closing behind it: because the reader follows the movement of his mind in the free flight of day-dreaming, whereas the copier submits it to command.
Books are not made for furniture, but there is nothing else that so beautifully furnishes a house.
Show me the books he loves and I shall know the man far better than through mortal friends.
The light that radiates from the great novels time can never dim, for human existence is perpetually being forgotten by man and thus the novelists discoveries, however old they may be, will never cease to astonish.
Definition of a classic: a book everyone is assumed to have read and often thinks they have.
If the doctor told me I had six minutes to live, I'd type a little faster.
To write well, express yourself like common people, but think like a wise man. Or, think as wise men do, but speak as the common people do.
Writers must fortify themselves with pride and egotism as best they can. The process is analogous to using sandbags and loose timbers to protect a house against flood. Writers are vulnerable creatures like anyone else. For what do they have in reality? Not sandbags, not timbers. Just a flimsy reputation and a name.
Tis the good reader that makes the good book; in every book he finds passages which seem to be confidences or sides hidden from all else and unmistakably meant for his ear; the profit of books is according to the sensibility of the reader; the profound thought or passion sleeps as in a mine, until it is discovered by an equal mind and heart.
Read, read, read. Read everything-- trash, classics, good and bad, and see how they do it. Just like a carpenter who works as an apprentice and studies the master. Read! You'll absorb it. Then write. If it is good, you'll find out. If it's not, throw it out the window.
To learn to read is to light a fire; every syllable that is spelled out is a spark.
Be as careful of the books you read, as of the company you keep; for your habits and character will be as much influenced by the former as by the latter.
The books we read should be chosen with great care, that they may be, as an Egyptian king wrote over his library, The medicines of the soul.
The best of a book is not the thought which it contains, but the thought which it suggests; just as the charm of music dwells not in the tones but in the echoes of our hearts.
Old books, you know well, are books of the world's youth, and new books are the fruits of its age.
All good books are alike in that they are truer than if they had really happened and after you are finished reading one you will feel that all that happened to you and afterwards it all belongs to you; the good and the bad, the ecstasy, the remorse, and sorrow, the people and the places and how the weather was.
If I have not read a book before, it is, for all intents and purposes, new to me whether it was printed yesterday or three hundred years ago.
In a real sense, people who have read good literature have lived more than people who cannot or will not read. It is not true that we have only one life to live; if we can read, we can live as many more lives and as many kinds of lives as we wish.
In any situation, ask yourself: What strengths do I possess that can contribute towards accomplishing something in this situation? Then follow through.
The only books that influence us are those for which we are ready, and which have gone a little farther down our particular path than we have yet got ourselves.
A house is not a home unless it contains food and fire for the mind as well as the body.
When you have mastered numbers, you will in fact no longer be reading numbers, any more than you read words when reading books You will be reading meanings.
The first time I read an excellent work, it is to me just as if I gained a new friend; and when I read over a book I have perused before, it resembles the meeting of an old one.
The unread story is not a story; it is little black marks on wood pulp. The reader, reading it, makes it live: a live thing, a story.
The greatest gift is the passion for reading. It is cheap, it consoles, it distracts, it excites, it gives you knowledge of the world and experience of a wide kind. It is a moral illumination.
Procrastination is the fear of success. People procrastinate because they are afraid of the success that they know will result if they move ahead now. Because success is heavy, carries a responsibility with it, it is much easier to procrastinate and live on the 'someday I'll' philosophy.
It is a good thing for an uneducated man to read books of quotations. Bartlett's Familiar Quotations is an admirable work, and I studied it intently. The quotations when engraved upon the memory give you good thoughts. They also make you anxious to read the authors and look for more.
Books that have become classics -- books that have had their day and now get more praise than perusal -- always remind me of retired colonels and majors and captains who, having reached the age limit, find themselves retired on half pay.
There are books which take rank in your life with parents and lovers and passionate experiences, so medicinal, so stringent, so revolutionary, so authoritative.
The praise of ancient authors proceeds not from the reverence of the dead, but from the competition and mutual envy of the living.
A book is never a masterpiece: it becomes one. Genius is the talent of a dead man.
A classic is classic not because it conforms to certain structural rules, or fits certain definitions (of which its author had quite probably never heard). It is classic because of a certain eternal and irrepressible freshness.
There are books so alive that you're always afraid that while you weren't reading, the book has gone and changed, has shifted like a river; while you went on living, it went on living too, and like a river moved on and moved away. No one has stepped twice into the same river. But did anyone ever step twice into the same book?
When you reread a classic, you do not see more in the book than you did before; you see more in you than there was before.
I read the newspaper avidly. It is my one form of continuous fiction.
When we read a story, we inhabit it. The covers of the book are like a roof and four walls. What is to happen next will take place within the four walls of the story. And this is possible because the story's voice makes everything its own.
Of all the ways of acquiring books, writing them oneself is regarded as the most praiseworthy method. Writers are really people who write books not because they are poor, but because they are dissatisfied with the books which they could buy but do not like.
A book is a garden, an orchard, a storehouse, a party, a company by the way, a counselor, a multitude of counselors.
He that loves a book will never want a faithful friend, a wholesome counselor, a cheerful companion, an effectual comforter. By study, by reading, by thinking, one may innocently divert and pleasantly entertain himself, as in all weathers, as in all fortunes.
Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider.
A real book is not one that we read, but one that reads us.
In the case of good books, the point is not how many of them you can get through, but rather how many can get through to you.
Books are the legacies that a great genius leaves to mankind, which are delivered down from generation to generation as presents to the posterity of those who are yet unborn.
A conventional good read is usually a bad read, a relaxing bath in what we know already. A true good read is surely an act of innovative creation in which we, the readers, become conspirators.
A book may be compared to your neighbor: if it be good, it cannot last too long; if bad, you cannot get rid of it too early.
Books are masters who instruct us without rods or ferules, without words or anger, without bread or money. If you approach them, they are not asleep; if you seek them, they do not hide; if you blunder, they do not scold; if you are ignorant, they do not laugh at you.
When I get a little money, I buy books; and if any is left I buy food and clothes.
If we encounter a man of rare intellect, we should ask him what books he reads.
No story is the same to us after a lapse of time; or rather we who read it are no longer the same interpreters.
The world of books is the most remarkable creation of man nothing else that he builds ever lasts monuments fall; nations perish; civilization grow old and die out; new races build others. But in the world of books are volumes that have seen this happen again and again and yet live on. Still young, still as fresh as the day they were written, still telling men's hearts, of the hearts of men centuries dead.
It is chiefly through books that we enjoy intercourse with superior minds, and these invaluable means of communication are in the reach of all. In the best books, great men talk to us, give us their most precious thoughts, and pour their souls into ours.
Reading a book is like re-writing it for yourself. You bring to a novel, anything you read, all your experience of the world. You bring your history and you read it in your own terms.
Of all the diversions of life, there is none so proper to fill up its empty spaces as the reading of useful and entertaining authors.
What we become depends on what we read after all the professors have finished with us. The greatest university of all is the collection of books.
The oldest books are still only just out to those who have not read them.
Surviving and thriving as a professional today demands two new approaches to the written word. First, it requires a new approach to orchestrating information, by skillfully choosing what to read and what to ignore. Second, it requires a new approach to integrating information, by reading faster and with greater comprehension.

Gems's authors/films

I haven't favorited any authors at the moment.

Gems's tags

I haven't favorited any tags at the moment.

Gems's friends

I haven't follow any friends at the moment.

Gems's feelings

I haven't rated any quotes at the moment.